Visitor interaction report

Web Analytics Dashboard about what visitors do on your pages.

Summary

The visitor interaction report focuses on how people engage with your content.

This report is entirely descriptive and includes no judgment about what each metric means for your content’s performance.

This report consists of the following metrics:

Metric

Definition

Next Mass.gov page

Links to other Mass.gov pages that visitors click on from your content. Corresponds with setting the current page to “previous page path” in Google Analytics.

Key interactions by URL

Links to downloads or other websites that visitors click on from your content. Corresponds with outbound link and download event tracking in Google Analytics.

“Yes” count

Number of “yes” feedback submissions to the “Did you find what you were looking for on this webpage” survey found at the bottom of most Mass.gov pages. Data is from Formstack.

“No” count

Number of “no” feedback submissions to the “Did you find what you were looking for on this webpage” survey found at the bottom of most Mass.gov pages. Data is from Formstack.

More on the metrics

Next Mass.gov page

Shows which Mass.gov page links visitors click on from your content both in terms of number of total clicks and percentage of overall clicks.

Reviewing this data can help you make decisions about placement of links on your page, possibly elevating or demoting them based on clicks, or rethinking the wording of link text to improve performance.

Next Mass.gov page

Key interactions by URL

Displays total downloads or clicks to offsite links. This can be especially useful data for pages whose main mission is to provide access to offsite resources or downloads.

Consider a page whose primary purpose is to provide access to a form, which people must fill out and mail to your agency. If you see that the eject rate is high, or that the percentage of downloads is very low vs. the number of pageviews, you might conclude that visitors are having a hard time locating the form.

To address this, you could link it in additional or more prominent places, change the link text to something more explicit, or change the page’s content to clarify that to obtain the service, visitors should fill out the form and mail it in. To see if your changes worked, you’d want to keep an eye on whether downloads rise.

Key interactions by URL

“Yes” and "No" count

The raw number of “yes” responses to the “Did you find what you were looking for on this webpage” survey found at the bottom of most Mass.gov pages. Overall page traffic should be kept in mind when evaluating these totals.

The raw number of “no” responses to the “Did you find what you were looking for on this webpage” survey found at the bottom of most Mass.gov pages. Overall page traffic should be kept in mind when evaluating these totals.

In many cases, the # of “nos” per 1000 sessions tracked in the page health report is more reflective of a page’s effectiveness.

"Yes" and "No" count chart

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